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Game 10

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tkolter
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Re: Game 10

Post by tkolter on Sat Sep 15, 2018 2:37 am

You my neighbor will have armies, I my spy network and willingness to use them in many fun ways, together we will defend Africa from outsiders who might do us harm.

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Re: Game 10

Post by Stuart Bailey on Sat Sep 15, 2018 10:31 am

tkolter wrote:You my neighbor will have armies, I my spy network and willingness to use them in many fun ways, together we will defend Africa from outsiders who might do us harm.

Agents in Glori are handy for letting you know what is in position to hit you which can be handy when trying to work out where to deploy your forces but are not much use at actually stopping an attack. Though perhaps they can delay it a bit if willing to use high risk "Sabotage" attempts rather than just having a look at what is in a particular location.

Generally speaking agents are more handy for planning and helping an attack rather than for defensive purposes. So if the Ottomans suddenly find Egypt and their Red Sea bases crawling with your agents the risk is that they may decide you are hostile and attack first.

The Corsairs can confirm that some people are just so lacking in trust of your honourable and peaceful intentions at such times.Shocked

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Re: Game 10

Post by Stuart Bailey on Sat Sep 15, 2018 11:25 am

Ref the G10 thread I am wondering if its title should be changed to "What Pope Clement did next?"

Also wondering if many people have had a look at the new "Miscellany" publication. If they have not G10 players may be interested to read P47 & 48 on the Gallican Church.

In view of the position of the Gallican Church do French players need to be carefull over what they accept from Rome? After all who are we to amend the Pragmatic Sanction of 1269 agree for France by a Saint and not just any Saint either but Saint Louis the Royal Saint of France.
Seems that decisions of a General Council of the Church are also above the Pope..............oh great I just hope Jason is not a expert on the Council of Trent or the Council of Constance etc.

The good news is that everyone agrees that the Pope has authority over canon law and page 29 had a section on Illegitimacy and Kingship in Catholic Europe (nothing about the Duke of Monmouth) with examples of illegitimate sons who had claimed the throne including:

- Manfred of Taranato an illegitimate son of the Emperor Frederick II who claimed the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies. The Pope called a crusade against him and a mostly French Army lead by a Duke of Anjou cut Manfred's head off. The Pope then made the Duke of Anjou King of the two Sicilies (in fief to Rome) for his trouble. But he only got Naples due to naughty men in Constantinople, Aragon and on the Island of Sicily who had no respect for the Pope and slaughtered Anjou's troops on the island as they came out of Church and later sunk a lot of his Navy.

- King Ferdinand I of Sicily who was later removed by legitimate relatives from Aragon/Spain

- John (or Joao) of Portugal the natural son who became King of Portugal in 1385 on the death of his legitimate half brother without issue. Since his legitimate brother became King before John its clearly the case in Portugal that a legitimate son ranks higher than a natural son but a natural son may outrank a legitimate sister since the alternative to John in 1385 was his legitimate sister Beatrice.

May be pushing it a bit to say this applies across Iberia since Beatrice was Queen of Castile and her husband invaded Portugal with a Spanish-French Army to enforce the claim of his wife only to be defeated by a Anglo-Portugese Army. Can of hard to say whay the Papal view on this was as at the time we had two Popes one on each side.

Generally speaking it seems the Papacy is really keen on upholding the institute of marriage and the rights of legitimate heirs. Guess that since so much of the Church is staffed by the natural children of the Nobility who "obey the rules" (apart from 1640 in Portugal) they do not like people who do not play by the rules. But holds the opinion that it can appoint who it wants to the Papal fiefs of Sicily and Sardinia.

What I find interesting is that whenever a issue like this comes up it always seems to involve Sicily or Portugal! In other places no one not even the men themselves tried to Crown Robert of Gloucester or Lord Hudson above legitimate sisters or tried to find a spare crown for Don Jon of Austria even thought his father had lots going spare and was dividing up his holdings amongst his family.
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Re: Game 10

Post by Rozwi_Game10 on Sat Sep 15, 2018 2:22 pm

Deacon wrote:Those dark pagans out of africa however...

Not to be confused with the dark Christians of the Kingdom of Kongo, the ones whom the European Christians claimed were pagans so they could be enslaved, mind    [see C16th history - Portugal and the Kingdom of Kongo]

Got to be careful what I write about on 'slavery' in southern Africa, since its mainly a C19th issue that went on into the C20th and it's repercussions are still a real issue today with various countries in that region.
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Re: Game 10

Post by Jason on Sat Sep 15, 2018 4:39 pm

Thanks Stuart, hadn't picked up on that in the Gallican Church.

Upon slavery, while obviously there wasn't a white "slave trade" in the same way as there was the African one, it did existed in an unofficial way. A little before the time of our games, but John Knox spent a period as a gallery slave on French galleys (don't get any ideas Stuart!), while what was effectively a slave trade in kidnapped children existed in Scotland in the 17th and 18th Centuries. Indian Pete https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Williamson_(memoirist) is an example, learnt a lot about him in my time in Aberdeen. He and other children were held in the Tolbooth (a sign that the town elders were involved in the trade) before being shipped to the American colonies, musicians played outside the building-both the entertain the kids but also cover up any cries for help.
Of course it was not anywhere near the level of the African slave trade and the child one from Scotland was technically for indentured service but not sure it would have felt much different
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Re: Game 10

Post by Jason on Sat Sep 15, 2018 4:49 pm

tkolter wrote:Oh they will once my spy network in the region and abroad are in place, I did the math and long term a well placed and used spy is worth far more than an military force and far cheaper per operative.

But I'm not ignoring  well armed defense with fortified cities and two planned two southern fortresses of David and Sampson one more Westerly and ones Easterly.

And I plan something else which should boost the defenses and supplement the armies nicely long term. Cool

If you don't mind saying Smile what level of technology does Abyssinia have in-game? I remember one of the supplements saying they had trebuchets, but do you have access to gunpowder weapons? Don't worry, this isn't intelligence gathering before a Scottish invasion Wink
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Re: Game 10

Post by tkolter on Sat Sep 15, 2018 5:52 pm

Yes the nation has firearms and gunpowder, its not commonly in use most of the armies are traditional. But I would assume decent technology the nation historically wasn't very bad at all. Anyway I have another reason for spies to get technology from other nations say an agent pays a lot for cannon makers to relocated to Abyssinia and teach their craft why should I research when others did it already or its common tech for them?

Spies are there for many reasons why sit there are work hard when some money and agent actions can get faster results and its not even sinister. Wink

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Re: Game 10

Post by Stuart Bailey on Sat Sep 15, 2018 11:55 pm

Jason wrote:.

Upon slavery, while obviously there wasn't a white "slave trade" in the same way as there was the African one, it did existed in an unofficial way.  A little before the time of our games, but John Knox spent a period as a gallery slave on French galleys (don't get any ideas Stuart!),

Under the modern classification "slavery" serfs in Eastern Europe and the large numbers either under sentence of penal service or indentured service (who seem to have formed the majority of the White population in some American colonies) would be classed as Slaves.

"Hanging" Judge Jefferies who dealt with the trials after the Monmouth Revolt (not a popular man in the West Country!) should actually be called "Transporting" Judge Jefferies as the vast majority of the captured rebels and a few who were just in the wrong place were not hung but we sentenced to penal service in the West Indies. From which the Judge, the Crown and West Indies planters made a tidy profit.

However, a more classic white slave trade was practiced by the Ottomans esp the North African Corsairs and the Tarco-Tartar border raiders. The size of this trade is hard to judge but in one year alone the state derived a income of 18,000 gold ducats from slaves sent south from Caffa (approx 4500 @ 4 ducats per slave) and Caffa was just one of many Ports like Azov, Kerch, Taman and Kopa involved in the trade.

Plus when we look at the establishment of Cossack hosts to guard the borders, and fortified frontier limes in Russia and Hapsburg lands we are clearly dealing with something more than just a bit of kidnapping. The Tarter Khan's and the Barbary Corsair Chiefs clearly had nothing to leave from African Slavers. But perhaps their targets were a bit more organized and prone to hit back that many African Tribes.

But perhaps in G10 the Emperor can compare notes with the Czar, the Polish Commonwealth and others about the evils of Ottoman and other Slave Raiders.
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Re: Game 10

Post by Jason on Sun Sep 16, 2018 12:40 pm

All good points Stuart.

Also, did you know serfdom still existed in Scotland, in a limited way, at this time? Not through the clan system but through mining (!). The short version is that if you were working in a Scottish coalmine at this time the law (passed in 1606) stated "no person should fee, hire or conduce and salters, colliers or coal bearers without a written authority from the master whom they had last served". Even when the Habeas Corpus Act was passed in Scotland in 1701 it had a clause excluding coal miners from its provisions. Though there was an act in the 1770s that started to end the practice, it wasn't until 1799 that it was abolished.
It is a point of discussion on whether the 1606 law effectively introduced this form of serfdom into the Scottish mines or simply established in written law what was accepted practice. Some historians say Scotland was the first place where serfdom as an institution died out in 14th Century so they tend to prefer the early 17th Century as its reintroduction for a particular part of society. Others feel the practice had always been there and all that happened in the early 17th Century that as coal mining in Scotland suddenly took off, and there was a shortage of those with the right skills, the mine owners got the law passed to secure their ancient rights over workers. I tend towards the latter as I feel, given the general uptty-ness of the Scots at this time, if this was a new thing those affected would have revolted against its introduction and there is no indication of that.

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Re: Game 10

Post by Stuart Bailey on Sun Sep 16, 2018 1:50 pm

Jason wrote:All good points Stuart.

Also, did you know serfdom still existed in Scotland, in a limited way, at this time?  Not through the clan system but through mining (!).  The short version is that if you were working in a Scottish coalmine at this time the law (passed in 1606) stated "no person should fee, hire or conduce and salters, colliers or coal bearers without a written authority from the master whom they had last served".  Even when the Habeas Corpus Act was passed in Scotland in 1701 it had a clause excluding coal miners from its provisions.  Though there was an act in the 1770s that started to end the practice, it wasn't until 1799 that it was abolished.  
It is a point of discussion on whether the 1606 law effectively introduced this form of serfdom into the Scottish mines or simply established in written law what was accepted practice.   Some historians say Scotland was the first place where serfdom as an institution died out in 14th Century so they tend to prefer the early 17th Century as its reintroduction for a particular part of society.   Others feel the practice had always been there and all that happened in the early 17th Century that as coal mining in Scotland suddenly took off, and there was a shortage of those with the right skills, the mine owners got the law passed to secure their ancient rights over workers.  I tend towards the latter as I feel, given the general uptty-ness of the Scots at this time, if this was a new thing those affected would have revolted against its introduction and there is no indication of that.

Odd how miners always seem to be a set apart in legal terms from the rest of society.

In Cornwall the tin miners had their own Parliament and now you have moved down south you may like to look at the contractural basis of the mining in the Forest of Dean. Think general uptty-ness of Scots coal miners plus extra isolation, lead fumes and religion.

Ref the experience of the Scots coal miners to see if they were getting a really bad deal or not - you probably have to look at their wages and conditions compared to Farm Labour, Sailors and Industrial workers.

The way the law is worded it seems not to be saying workers could not go and work elsewhere. But was aimed at stopping mine owners from trying to pich rival mine owners labour by offering bonus payments and the like to induce miners to break their existing contract. Thus only indirectly was the law being used to stop miners getting higher wages by going off to work in another mine?

Wonder if Scots mines were fairly small with limited time before they were worked out and miners had to move on. So was the expectation a bit like the merchant Navy were you signed to do a certain voyage (or work a mine) and were then bound in contract to complete the voyage (work out the mine) before you moved onto your next ship/mine?

Not sure about Scotland but in the West Country the general conception was that compared to farming and other industries miners had the worst job and in return should be paid higher than other workers.





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Re: Game 10

Post by Rozwi_Game10 on Sun Sep 16, 2018 3:50 pm

Jason wrote:...do you have access to gunpowder weapons?

Just to remind myself, as much as anyone else, Rozwi can produce black powder firearms if needed. I don't know what the level of gunpowder supplies would be, however? And I'm guessing all issued firearms and gun powder would be purchased from foreign merchants and not locally produced. LOW AMMO might be an issue after a battle, I'd think? (do we still have such a state in this version of the game?)

Stuart Bailey wrote:...miners had the worst job and in return should be paid higher than other workers.

Rozwi's miners are on double pay due to the dangerous nature of their job. I suppose this is where the use of a slave labour force would come in handy (and contemporary mining methods!)

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Re: Game 10

Post by Jason on Sun Sep 16, 2018 6:40 pm

Stuart Bailey wrote: Odd how miners always seem to be a set apart in legal terms from the rest of society.

In Cornwall the tin miners had their own Parliament and now you have moved down south you may like to look at the contractural basis of the mining in the Forest of Dean.  Think general uptty-ness of Scots coal miners plus extra isolation, lead fumes and religion.

Ref the experience of the Scots coal miners to see if they were getting a really bad deal or not - you probably have to look at their wages and conditions compared to Farm Labour, Sailors and Industrial workers.  

The way the law is worded it seems not to be saying workers could not go and work elsewhere.  But was aimed at stopping mine owners  from trying to pich rival mine owners labour by offering bonus payments and the like to induce miners to break their existing contract.  Thus only indirectly was the law being used to stop miners getting higher wages by going off to work in another mine?

Wonder if Scots mines were fairly small with limited time before they were worked out and miners had to move on.  So was the expectation a bit like the merchant Navy were you signed to do a certain voyage (or work a mine) and were then bound in contract to complete the voyage (work out the mine) before you moved onto your next ship/mine?

Not sure about Scotland but in the West Country the general conception was that compared to farming and other industries miners had the worst job and in return should be paid higher than other workers.


I had the chance to visit the mining museum at Radstock recently, very informative on the local coal mining industry.

You're right on the difference-ness of miners. In Scotland they seem to have got the rough end of the deal-nothing like Stannery courts or parliaments, miners who ran away were regularly dragged back, anyone who employed a miner without written permission of their former employer was sued, no evidence of generally better pay (with some periods of extremes in both directions), etc. Frankly the situation in Scotland was if you worked in the mine you were tied to that mine, it also seems traditional-your dad worked the mines, so you did so you son did. I have seen claims of such things as miners not allowed to marry without the mine owners permission, etc, but the source material isn't always secure shall we say Wink From what I've seen there doesn't seem any indication that the miners were better paid, had generally better conditions, etc than the rest of the workforce, that offset their legal status.

The mines themselves had varying lives, some short, some incredibly long. There were some quite amazing innovations in the industry too at various times but it was always small compared to England and other nations.
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Re: Game 10

Post by Jason on Sun Sep 16, 2018 6:48 pm

Rozwi_Game10 wrote:
Jason wrote:...do you have access to gunpowder weapons?

Just to remind myself, as much as anyone else, Rozwi can produce black powder firearms if needed. I don't know what the level of gunpowder supplies would be, however? And I'm guessing all issued firearms and gun powder would be purchased from foreign merchants and not locally produced. LOW AMMO might be an issue after a battle, I'd think? (do we still have such a state in this version of the game?)


That's interesting. I must admit I had assumed tribal societies like the Rozwi wouldn't have had the skills. Does Richard state any limits on your ability to manufacture firearms? For example in China, you can only manufacture matchlocks and artillery isn't wheeled.

There is a low ammo rule in games, best countered with magazines and (I think?) supply lines.
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Re: Game 10

Post by tkolter on Mon Sep 17, 2018 12:15 am

Well this is a classic Abyssinian weapon ... so yes the Ethiopians have metallurgy to a decent level and well use it well.

Demonstation Video

Very crude and primitive. Twisted Evil
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Re: Game 10

Post by Rozwi_Game10 on Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:39 am

Jason wrote:
Rozwi_Game10 wrote:
Jason wrote:...do you have access to gunpowder weapons?

Just to remind myself, as much as anyone else, Rozwi can produce black powder firearms if needed. I don't know what the level of gunpowder supplies would be, however? And I'm guessing all issued firearms and gun powder would be purchased from foreign merchants and not locally produced. LOW AMMO might be an issue after a battle, I'd think? (do we still have such a state in this version of the game?)


That's interesting.  I must admit I had assumed tribal societies like the Rozwi wouldn't have had the skills.  Does Richard state any limits on your ability to manufacture firearms?  For example in China, you can only manufacture matchlocks and artillery isn't wheeled.

There is a low ammo rule in games, best countered with magazines and (I think?) supply lines.


Matchlock only and no artillery.

To be honest, I've always considered it a left-over from the position info from the expanded early versions of LGDR (when the game wasn't, possibly, as interested in historical accuracy and allowed more freedom to wargame). Since January 1700 the Rozwi 'what we can and can't build' info has been altered slightly since I've been asking questions and stating what certain weapons are - such as, spears are the stabbing variety and not throwing, and having Africans have access to river canoes.

As I've said in the past, I went into this position not having much luck finding info on the historic Rozwi / Rozvi so couldn't base my game plan on something comparable. There is some info available on the earlier kingdoms who the Karange Rozvi conquered as they moved into the Great Zimbabwe civilisations area, but I couldn't find the information for free on the Internet and the books were either expensive, or only had short passages on these specifics as they concentrated on the larger African history. It was easier to just base my game-play on the amaZulu tribe, at the time, and I've just been fudging it ever since, basing it all on Shaka's Zulu nation and adding bits from other Bantu Tribal Africans as I choose.

Of interest is the fact that the Rozwi page on Wikipedia has considerably grown with information since this game's first turn. Coincidence? Certainly it wasn't me who has been updating the information. Whomever is responsible certainly has my thanks elephant

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rozwi_Empire
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Re: Game 10

Post by tkolter on Mon Sep 17, 2018 4:36 pm

I have some ideas on how to fast track getting technology which would be of use to the Abyssinian Empire. It's at lest something no one tried before or it would be in the rules or in the back posts for these games so it might be innovative. If it doesn't work oh well it would be worth the try.

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Re: Game 10

Post by J Flower on Mon Sep 17, 2018 5:42 pm

"I had the chance to visit the mining museum at Radstock recently, very informative on the local coal mining industry. "

Just so you know I actually went to school just up the road from that Museeum, how small the world is, & yes my Grandfather worked down the mines of the Somerset coalfields,in a small village not far from Radstock. There are still millions of tons of coal there but the seams are small & not economically viable to dig out with maschinary, The best steam coal in the country came from the area, if your interested there is are the remains of Fussels Iron works near Mells as well to look at, Iron, wool coal were the main commodities in the area 200 years ago.

Miners certainly had it hard, looking at pictures my Grnadfather had collected was interesting, young boys with the guss & crook etc.

Also appears the number of pubs in mining areas is disproportionally higer than in other parts of the country, albeit I confess there maybe a need for more research in this theory , maybe willing volenteers can be found to do pub crawls around former mining districts ?

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Re: Game 10

Post by J Flower on Mon Sep 17, 2018 7:27 pm

Basileus wrote:Just to help give you the overall picture, the official French governments honour score has plummeted because of the activities of the men from St Malo. I can think of no other reason why Richard has hit the French honour score every time the corsairs do something.


Just had a thought about this one, whilst thinking about the Popes request for information on the claimants, re-read the Partition treaty that was written by Comte de Forbin  & has been signed by France & UDP, it may be that the treaty is causing honour problems for France :-

"Preamble - Being an agreement to secure the peace of Europe with due respect for the will of the late King Carlos II & Catholic laws of succession.
a) All signatories promise to support and uphold the draft will of the late King Carlos II of Spain and the legitimate heirs to the Kingdom of Spain, Kingdom of Naples, Duchy of Milan & Duchy of Flanders. Under no circumstances are the illegal claims of Rodrigo de Abello to be accepted.
b) As an allowed exception to clause a) above - Charles von Hapsburg King of Spain & Philip de Bourbon King of Naples agree to exchange the Duchies of Milan & Flanders. Making Charles von Hapsburg Duke of Flanders and Philip de Bourbon Duke of Milan"

Currently France, or at least the French faction hold both Flanders & Milan, admittedly not France itself, but self proclaimed supporters, I wonder if that could have an impact on French main position honour?

Could loyal supporters doing things in the King of Frances name, mean it can also effect his honour via their actions although he may have  little say or control of the overall situation? Would the same be true for the Kaiser with regard the HRR? or in the current Saxony- Poland semi shared posiiton in G10, not to mention little old Blighty & their Dutch King!
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Re: Game 10

Post by Deacon on Mon Sep 17, 2018 7:37 pm


Lot of moving parts for a big nation like France to try to pin down an honour drop. Making promises you don't keep would certainly be one of them.

But if you're really concerned about honour drops, I think you can legitimately ask an advisor you trust what the chattering classes are upset about these days. I think if you roleplay it, you can get a general sense of what your nobles think you're doing wrong.

Richard has said he'd ding people for complaining about honour, but I think it's perfectly reasonable to try to figure out what your court is expecting of you. Then you can decide if you want to give them what they want, or let them sod off and do what you were doing anyway.

I suspect if you over-used it, you'd end up getting dinged for that too, since you shouldn't be seen as too concerned about what the chattering classes think about you.

But as a one-off trying to figure out what you're doing 'wrong', I think it could be a good help.

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Re: Game 10

Post by Stuart Bailey on Mon Sep 17, 2018 8:15 pm

J Flower wrote:"I had the chance to visit the mining museum at Radstock recently, very informative on the local coal mining industry. "

Just so you know I actually went to school just up the road from that Museeum, how small the world is, & yes my Grandfather worked down the mines of the Somerset coalfields,in a small village not far from Radstock. There are still millions of tons of coal there but the seams are small & not economically viable to dig out with maschinary, The best steam coal in the country came from the area, if your interested there is are the remains of Fussels Iron works near Mells as well to look at, Iron, wool coal were the main commodities in the area 200 years ago.

Miners certainly had it hard, looking at pictures my Grnadfather had collected was interesting, young boys with the guss & crook etc.

Also appears the number of pubs in mining areas is disproportionally higer than in other parts of the country, albeit I confess there maybe a need for more research in this theory , maybe willing volenteers can be found to do pub crawls around former mining districts ?

The other Jason may also be interested in the "Big Pit" close to Newport (place on other side of Bristol Channel which true Bristolians try and ignore as a general rule).  Couple of interesting tours of the mines as they were 1960's and 1840's.

Close to 50 years ago used to live at Parkfield Rank Pucklechurch - think a rank of houses like you would get in a town but with a large outbuilding and a allotment style garden attached picked up and put down in the middle of the country.  These were originally miners cottages for the Pucklechurch pit and some old miners still lived their 50 years ago.

Still recall one old chap who must have been 80 at the time speaking with pride amount the quality of the coal and diving under a chair to show the narrow nature of the seams from which the coal was cut out with a pick in 12 hour shifts.  With added problem that Pucklechurch was a very wet pit (why it closed in the end) and it was normal to work a narrow seam half filled with water.

That is what you call real graft!

Interestingly in the Glori du Roi period such men were in major demand to provide the miners and sappers who due the approach trenchs and mines which played such a important part in the siege warfare of the period.  Oh great all of the fun of civilian mining plus chance of getting shot, blown up or gassed!  On the plus side you got paid by the metre, but we then get period accounts of men getting big payments going on their next shift still drunk and getting killed due to making mistakes.

Personally, I would blame the small beer drunk for breakfast which the rest of us thought was basically a flavoured (safer) water until Jason pointed out it could be up to 5% strength.  Allowing the GM a perfect reason for really idiotic NPC's.........bad batch of beer and they were still drunk.

Tried to claim that my tea total Rumelian Cavalry should get an advantage over hung over Cossacks, Poles, Russians etc but I dont think Richard was willing to go along with this view.

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Re: Game 10

Post by Stuart Bailey on Mon Sep 17, 2018 8:54 pm

Deacon wrote:
Lot of moving parts for a big nation like France to try to pin down an honour drop. Making promises you don't keep would certainly be one of them.

But if you're really concerned about honour drops, I think you can legitimately ask an advisor you trust what the chattering classes are upset about these days. I think if you roleplay it, you can get a general sense of what your nobles think you're doing wrong.

Richard has said he'd ding people for complaining about honour, but I think it's perfectly reasonable to try to figure out what your court is expecting of you. Then you can decide if you want to give them what they want, or let them sod off and do what you were doing anyway.

I suspect if you over-used it, you'd end up getting dinged for that too, since you shouldn't be seen as too concerned about what the chattering classes think about you.

But as a one-off trying to figure out what you're doing 'wrong', I think it could be a good help.


My character(s) are fine upstanding members and chatty members of the French Court who say lots of nice things about his most Christain Majesty but clearly Louis XIV honour would be a lot higher if he had:

- Pinned the Bavarian Army in Flanders against the Dutch border and smashed it to a pulp for backing a Cabal of arch traitors in Madrid trying to make a South American questionable birth Duke of Flanders.

- Trashed Tuscany for insulting the Bourbon Flag

- Marched into Rome and cut off Cardinal Portocarrero's head for Teason/Witchcraft etc

Of course other members of the Court may be saying other things! Like do not listen to that nasty rough man!! Just wish they would say something near the Sieur du Gue so he can really get into the spirit of Louis XIV court and call the cads out!

Guess poor Louis in G10 is just going to have to do his best impression of Lord Derby in SFE when the Tory backwoods men of the HEIC drop his prestige below that of Triads and Opium dealers on a fairly regular basis.

Like most things in games moderated by Richard I suspect having other players hanging round your court or sitting behind you in the Lords comes with pro's and cons. Clearly bit of a liability in peace but perhaps at other times I may not be a total liability to France and Britannia.pale
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Jason
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Re: Game 10

Post by Jason on Mon Sep 17, 2018 9:33 pm

tkolter wrote:Well this is a classic Abyssinian weapon ... so yes the Ethiopians have metallurgy to a decent level and well use it well.

Demonstation Video

Very crude and primitive. Twisted Evil

An interesting weapon, one to observe from afar Wink
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Jason
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Re: Game 10

Post by Jason on Mon Sep 17, 2018 9:34 pm

J Flower wrote:"I had the chance to visit the mining museum at Radstock recently, very informative on the local coal mining industry. "

Just so you know I actually went to school just up the road from that Museeum, how small the world is, & yes my Grandfather worked down the mines of the Somerset coalfields,in a small village not far from Radstock. There are still millions of tons of coal there but the seams are small & not economically viable to dig out with maschinary, The best steam coal in the country came from the area, if your interested there is are the remains of Fussels Iron works near Mells as well to look at, Iron, wool coal were the main commodities in the area 200 years ago.

Miners certainly had it hard, looking at pictures my Grnadfather had collected was interesting, young boys with the guss & crook etc.

Also appears the number of pubs in mining areas is disproportionally higer than in other parts of the country, albeit I confess there maybe a need for more research in this theory , maybe willing volenteers can be found to do pub crawls around former mining districts ?

What a co-incidence, like you say a small world Smile
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Re: Game 10

Post by Jason on Mon Sep 17, 2018 9:41 pm

tkolter wrote:I have some ideas on how to fast track getting technology which would be of use to the Abyssinian Empire. It's at lest something no one tried before or it would be in the rules or in the back posts for these games so it might be innovative. If it doesn't work oh well it would be worth the try.

It's a;ways worth a try Smile I think Richard is very open to well-thought out new ideas, have tried a few and not only have they been successful they have been added to the rule books, etc
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Deacon
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Re: Game 10

Post by Deacon on Mon Sep 17, 2018 10:13 pm


Ditto. Some of the stuff I've done has ended up in some of the newer supplements.

Two thoughts from me:

1) Your get-rich-quick scheme isn't going to work no matter how well thought out it is. Game balance is a thing, so have realistic expectations.

2) It is far easier to catch up to the rest of the world, than to surpass them. So ideas to dig yourself out of a hole will work far better than your attempts to create the "weapon of winning".

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Re: Game 10

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