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A bunch of silly newbie questions

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Nexus06
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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Nexus06 on Sat Feb 18, 2017 6:01 pm

J Flower wrote:It's a long way if you use the Russian navy they go via Alaska.

However back to Nexus original Question, you can probably look at your computer game for inspiration, There are probably buildings & other improvements that you can look to transfer across to LGDR world, don't expect them to function in exactly the same way, but if your lucky then the effects may be similar.

The joy of LGDR is the fact you can delve as deep or shallow as you like, you can if you wish name all your ships & give them captains, similarly with all your Land units, lists of historically accurate names & designations, uniform colours etc. are all readily available, or you can simply name units after the towns & cities where you raise them, or simply leave them unnamed as 10F,5D, 3FA the important bit is it is up to you.

You have the pleasure of free range orders which you don't have with the computer game, if you wish to create a Mad Duke of Baden who enjoys chasing butterflies then you are free to do so.

Look at your position, maybe research it historically look at the mistakes it's historical leaders made & their achievements, see if any of them are worth transferring across into LGDR.

On Trade ask your advisor's what your main imports / exports are, so you can look to shape your trade investment, so you can support areas where your trade is strong, don't forget investing in the trade area where your nation has it's homeland can also help the main Economic Health because a part of the investment goes into the local economy, also the earlier in the year that trade investments are made the more productive they will be. If you actually name a commodity to trade it it focuses the investment, however there is the danger that others invest in exactly the same trade commodity , which can cause losses
Some commodity ideas:- Salt, Rice, Silk, Tobacco, Cocoa, Cotton, leather, sugar, wine, glass, ivory, Carpets, Cattle, Fish, Furs, Dyes, Spices, Tea, opium, Jewels, Paper, Soap.
Taxation; is trouble, you can lower it to raise Economic Health & be seen as a benevolent ruler, but just try & raise it again & there will be trouble, best advise is leave it alone until you think you know where your finances are. Raised taxes on Nobility& Church just mean higher rents& tithes on the Commoners, who basically bear the brunt.
Economy; Try for things that can improve your economy & also tie in with your main exports, If you have an Engineering academy get them to develop improved versions of everyday items, windmills, waterwheels etc, they give an overall general improvement in productivity.

You can of course sit down & do the maths to work out how much money you are going to get, the problem is there are a lot of random "Agema" Factors out there, also the feared "Watts atom" is on the loose, both of which tied in with the actions of the most unstable "Fellow Player gene" will probably throw most of your calculations out of the window, still that is the foundation stone of LGDR it is historical but doesn't follow history. The special orders can make or break your turn, be prepared for outcomes you didn't want or predict & enjoy it when they actually do what you intended ( I have heard this has occasional happened.)

A personal note if you are a Russian player, the reason Russia cannot Raise Line ships at the start of the game, is a way of saving the Russian player money & recruits, because all they do is sink or mutiny, best place for such ships is a a model in an empty Vodka bottle.....

JF thanks for sharing your opinion with me, i 've much appreciated it. Especially for the role playing part, which ai really like it.

I'll take deep reflection on the second part (the economic one) as i think you put a lot of good hints inside.

Concerning line ships... well, they need to be trained well, on a good 10 years campaign Smile

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Thelittleemperor on Sat Feb 18, 2017 6:14 pm

Just the job , thanks very much once again.

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Thelittleemperor on Wed Mar 01, 2017 2:32 pm

Anyone know what the rulebook says about "earthworks " in Core Rules issue 7 ? Mine just seems to cut off mid sentence .What are the missing words likely to be
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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Rozwi_Game10 on Wed Mar 01, 2017 3:47 pm

According to my rules book V, it should read:


"Fortified lines can be used to protect a river bank or a length of frontier. These lines consist of earthwork defences and obstacles, while utilising local features of the terrain to strengthen their defences and make passage over them more difficult if the lines are held by troops."

[Page 23 in rules book VII]

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Thelittleemperor on Wed Mar 01, 2017 4:08 pm

Yes,fortified lines, not earthworks , thanks Rowzi ,
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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Rozwi_Game10 on Wed Mar 01, 2017 4:46 pm

No problem. I knew which part you meant as I've also got rules 7, and had to pencil in the missing part of the sentence.

Its lucky I kept rules book 5, as I find there's a few titbits of information in the older book that are omitted from the newer 7. From memory, its the civic works section in book 5 that I reference when ordering new institutes, as the newer book doesn't list all that the old featured (or I'm mixing the sections up. I know book 5 has bits that isn't in book 7, but its not anything game-changing so people shouldn't worry about it).

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Stuart Bailey on Thu Mar 02, 2017 9:39 pm


As well as major engineering works like the great Verban style bastioned fortresses and fortified lines like the non plus ultra lines designed to shield an entire region. Our period also made much use of much smaller and quicker to build works in earth and wood.

The Schellenberg, Malplaquet, Narva, Perth & Poltava are all major battles in our period in which field works played a large part.

If you want to copy Peter the Great at the last three battles or the French & Bavarians at the first two and fight a defensive battle. Or you just want to defend your camp, army, supplies, siege operations from relief attempts any troops who have orders to "defend" can be ordered to dig in as well. Personally I find it helps to have some engineers to direct matters and to pay out some bonus cash for digging but its not vital.

Some Armies such as the Russians, Ottomans and Austrians in the East seem to be a lot more keen on digging than other armies (I blame Winged Hussars myself) but at times almost all the major armies dug in. Just remember if "digging in" make sure you have a handy exit if your in your fortified siege lines gets stormed (Peter the Great problem at Narva) or make them so strong that no one can get in or out so you end up under siege and running out of supplies like Peter at Purth.

The French Army dug some very cheap and simple but effective field defences in a few days before Malplaquet but Peters camp at the Narva and at the Purth were so strongly dug in that in game terms they probably fall into Catagory of "reinforced" field works. To copy this in game you really need to build stockades...these cost 5000 and take three months. Or have your Engineers assemble Ottoman style "palenko" style field works or like Churchill at Lille have them build a proper 12 foot deep ditch in front of field works. Which its fair to assme also costs time and money.

But on the plus side its cheaper and not everyone has the time to go around building a Verban style fortress.

Like with the rows over Sword V Lance both Historic commanders and players seem to be split over the best way to protect a Siege from outside attack. Some say use a seperate Army of Observation and fight any relief in the open while others say dig lines of Contravallation and fight any relief force from the protection of your siege lines. I think this one is a "All depends" issue without a wrong or right answer.

But I would be interested in how player opinion split's on the issue? and why?


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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by J Flower on Fri Mar 03, 2017 9:09 am

I think with the question of which is the best way to defend the siege depends most probably on various factors, you can of course build a second line of earthworks to protect the siege lines themselves, which was advocated as part of a siege operation by many, but it will need to be manned as well, obviously action of you opponent will also dictate your actions to a certain extend, is a relief force expected, & if then what sort of size is expected to attack, an army of observation may well be enough to defend in an open field clash. But lack of forces may mean that a fortified position is required.


Also do you go for a formal siege, long boring process, chances of inuring high sickness levels , & danger of supplies & powder running low. Or do you go for the rapid assault which will probably also bring at best high sickness levels at worst high casualties, but if successful will get the result you need before the enemies relief force tips up.

Whilst on the subject of differing opinions there is also the question of how many ranks you deploy your infantry in. The more ranks you have I think in rule book six is the highest given, the more offensive power your infantry has as the back ranks push the front rank forward, which is all right so long as you have the tactic of going straight in with the bayonet, as in a fire fight you can bring less muskets to bear.

Two ranks was something that Wellington had to adopt mainly because his battalions strength had dropped & he needed to find a way to cover distance on the battle front.When replacements were available they reverted to three ranks, the major problem with two ranks is "shrinkage" of the line, as casualties mount the lines length reduces, as gaps are "dressed" in three or more ranks men were pushed forward to fill the ranks in front so maintaining unit frontage. The shrinkage has the effect of allowing gaps to appear between battalions. Also the longer a line the more problems you have with command & control, also on the move the dressing of the line is harder to maintain meaning more time is required to stop & realign the formation in question.

So there are advantages & disadvantages with either deeper or broader formations, when deciding on how many ranks think about how it may impact on your doctrine.

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Stuart Bailey on Sun Mar 05, 2017 6:46 pm


I dont think that just because a Army was drilled to use shock action in open field battles its going to disadvantage them when defending fortifications or field works since in such situations fire was normally by individual aimed shots rather than volley fire. Though some armies esp when defending proper fortifications use fire by files with the best shot doing all the shooting which the rest of the file loaded and passed him loaded muskets.

De Saxe who generally had a low opinion of musket fire believed that this was one of the few times musket fire was really effective with troops having the advantage of "rested" weapons and with the element of security provided by their defences taking the time to load properly and shot in a calm and effective manner rather than just blasting off in a panic & in a rush to fire at the same time as everyone else.
The absolute slaughter of the Dutch Guards and other units attacking French (a shock army) defended field works at Malplaquet would seem to indicate De Saxe may have had a point.

While the Malplaquet example would tend to indicate digging lines of Contravallation rather than using a Army of Obervation. I think the use of lines of Contravallation would seem to have two big problem a) The large area which need to be covered and the possibility that a relief force can punch a hole if you are too widely spread out b) Troops near a siege seem to pick up sickness levels easily.

Think this is a tricky one which needs to be looked at on a case by case basis.................for the rest actual attempts to storm a fortress using ladders is something for the Swedes! For anyone else its nuts!!

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by J Flower on Sun Mar 12, 2017 7:00 pm

Advantage of defending earthworks or other field works, is that you can rest your weapon making it easier to aim, that said muskets are still an inaccurate weapon.
The French did experiment with fire by files for defensive fire.

The idea of aiming was still in it's infancy, the connection with range & point of aim were understood but not always put into action, plus at long range the idea of aiming over the head of the target is an unnatural feeling, likewise at close range aiming low is a strange feeling. Aiming at the middle of the mass at all ranges seems to have been the general rule of thumb.

All armies were drilled in offensive & defensive doctrine, maybe we as players only write one set of doctrine orders & just leave it at that, but really each situation would be judged on it's own merits.

Virtually ever Nation claimed the bayonet as their weapon of choice, but only rarely did melee occur because either one side would run away or the other would falter in the attack & a fire fight would ensue.

Russians were renowned for digging in & being stubborn on the defensive, but also aggressive in the attack, the same could be said for virtually every nation, on it's day.
The French elan & desire for the attack are also famous, but when need be they could also defend & win.

Leadership & motivation also play major parts of any engagement.

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Nexus06 on Tue Mar 14, 2017 7:58 am

This part concerning battle tactics and siege it's extremely interesting. But i fail to understand how in game you can obtain such a higt resolution concerning battlefield and siege tactics. Those are actions that require decisions in days or hours, while we have here monthly turns!

I'm not a huge battle player (actually, i'm not at all) and i feel i miss a "full land and sea battle rules supplement" for the game. Shoud i suggest Richard to create one (i would definitely buy it). War rules are scattered trought the different manuals but i cannot reckon i've found such elements clearly described.

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by J Flower on Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:33 am

Seem to remember back in G2 that Richard & players knew a battle was imminent & asked them to submit orders for the coming battle . But this was an exception rather than the rule.

Problem lies as you rightly point out in the fact that pitched battles take normally a few hours to conclude, whereas the game is monthly based, so basically you are down to the orders given to your general on the spot, is he to attack or defend & at which level of determination.

There were some tactical subtleties in play, but the rigid system of advancing in line with cavalry on the flanks can be limiting.

At sea it is worse due to the lack of a reliable comms system the line ahead was introduced, which basically means sailing in two lines & hitting hell out of each other, which removes a lot of skill & strategy. There are ways around it but, you need a good navy & commanders to implement it.

Maybe you should have a good at the Napoleonic battles game, if it is still up & running,, wonder if Richard would do a 1700s special version.

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Nexus06 on Tue Mar 14, 2017 11:41 am

J Flower wrote:

Maybe you should have a good at the Napoleonic battles game, if it is still up & running, wonder if Richard would do a 1700s special version.

I can be helpful in this!

I was wondering the same question, as you know, and i've found out that agema do provide rulebook for miniatures battle in the age of Marlborough. They are quite affordable (3 pdf version).

Of course, they aren't a battle rulebook for "the Glory of King", but they are based on the agema mechanic wich, IN MY OPINION, could be somehow used also in our game. Their comprehension could help comprehend the use of certain commands to the troops.

I gave them a try and read them in the weekend.

To be exhaustive, i've asked Richard and he said that no directly related tGoK battle rulebook exist.
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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Deacon on Tue Mar 14, 2017 2:15 pm


Richard at one point in the forum did say the rules he used for resolving battles in Glory weren't in the other rulebooks he sold, so take that idea of using his age of Marlborough rules with a grain of salt.

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Nexus06 on Tue Mar 14, 2017 2:21 pm

Deacon wrote:
Richard at one point in the forum did say the rules he used for resolving battles in Glory weren't in the other rulebooks he sold, so take that idea of using his age of Marlborough rules with a grain of salt.

I agree and endorse this point of view!

I'll try to make this statement as clear as possible. I'm a decent role player, and a project manager in real life. BUT i'm no wargamer at all. if i play a PC game, i let my generals manage the battle. Having to understand how armies and navy were used in that age, at first i've studied "the warfare in the age of Marlborough", then i've managed to acquire the agema miniatures battle rulebook, wich is suitable for the agema miniature battle itself but should in no way be intended as the "engine" behind the tGoK game battle system, wich Richard stated "do not exist as rulebook itself".

I read it and find it useful for a dummy newbie as i am in this argument, wich is the development and use of an army the XVIII sec.

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by J Flower on Wed Mar 15, 2017 9:12 am

I think to be honest the approach of let your generals & Admirals sort the mess out for themselves is probably not a bad starting point, they will usually automatically adopt the tactics of the time, maybe with some of the drill & doctrine that players have introduced.

You can of course give the basic orders of attack/ defend, or even elaborate to a certain degree with orders to build earthworks of attempt to outflank. Personally find that the more detail you put into orders or the more angles & eventualities you try to cover the more chances there are for misunderstanding, misinterpretation & general calamity along with major disaster riding to the head of your troops.

Probably a good idea that none of us has access to Richards Golden Rulebook, as it means we cannot be tempted to play the rules or compute our chances of success. Every engagement has an inbuilt risk, with benefits & problems arising for both winner & loser.

Reading the rulebook, will along with other research hopefully give a feel for the period, which with a bit of luck could increase general enjoyment of the game.

Learnt long ago not to try & double guess the Agema system, when you think you can see the light at the end of the tunnel, you will then suddenly realise it is attached to a train travelling towards you.
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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by The Real Louis on Wed Mar 15, 2017 2:39 pm

Sadly, for my current role, I've no experience whatsoever of major warfare (opponents in Game 8, ignore that, please). My only experience was in Game 6 where, when I took over the position, France was stuck with a large army out-classed by local guerrillas and trapped in Fez (there were no big armies to fight or significant towns to capture). In my ignorance/innocence I orders as follows:

At Fez:-
a Sally Force is put together from elements of Bonneville's Expedition and the 78th Army, consisting of
(from Bonneville's Expedition):-
18th Regiment of Foot (3 battalions, excellently drilled)
3rd Cavalry Brigade (15 horse squadrons)
13th Regiment of Dragoons (5 dragoon squadrons)
6 field artillery batteries
(from the 78th Army)
5 horse squadrons (excellently drilled)
1st Dragoon Regiment (6 dragoon squadrons)
29th Regiment of Dragoons (5 dragoon squadrons)
Under the command of Colonel Jacques de la Bouton (standard personality No 16).
On a day of suitable weather, at mid-morning, the 10 infantry battalions of Bonneville's 5th Infantry
Brigade line the walls of the city, along with whatever artillery they can bring to bear.
If the blockading Moorish cavalry are initially well within range they are fired upon until they withdraw.
If they are not within range the infantry (and any cannon) fire a few volleys towards them, into the ground
at two-thirds their true optimum range. If this tempts the Moors to approach closer, the infantry (and any
cannon) wait until they are within optimum range to give them a good basting.
In either case the 5th Brigade (and any cannon) provide any necessary covering fire while the Sally Force
emerges through the city gate(s) and deploys beneath the walls as follows:-The 3 battalions of infantry are in line formation, two ranks deep (as per 1706 regulations), with
one field-artillery battery on either side of each battalion (i.e. one on the extreme left flank, one on
the extreme right flank and two each in the two gaps between battalions) ●▬●●▬●●▬●
The 3rd Cavalry Brigade supplemented by the 5 horse squadrons from the 78th Army divides into
two equal forces of 10 squadrons each, one on either flank of the infantry.
The 13th, 1st and 29th Dragoon regiments form a second two-rank line behind the main
formation.
If the Moors are not disposed to charge and engage, the formation advances at the walk, allowing the
space between the main formation and the dragoons to open a little. The advance continues until either
the blockade can be considered broken, or the Moors attack or the Moors come within musket/artillery
range. Whenever the Moors are within range the formation halts and fires upon them until they either
attack or withdraw.
If the Moors attack they are fired-upon steadily as they advance. If directly charged by the Moors the
infantry will form squares (as per 1706 regulations), incorporating the artillery. The two blocks of cavalry
on the wings will attempt to circle outward and fall obliquely upon the flanks of the attacking Moors. If
the Moors in turn attempt to encircle or flank-attack the advance body, the Dragoon Regiments are to
advance at the charge, dividing to left and right as needed in order to protect the advance guard and roll up
the flanks of the Moors.
The operation is to be considered over either when a) the Moors are defeated, or b) they withdraw
sufficiently for the blockade to be consider broken, or c) the day draws to a close or e) when (Mars forbid)
the Sally Force is over-run. In all cases the Sally Force withdraws into the city before dusk, under
covering-fire (if need be) from the walls as before.


This resulted in a Newspaper report as follows:-

Marshal de Bonneville ordered the musketeers of the French 5th Infantry Brigade to line the battlements of Fez, but after sending out officers to check was thwarted in attempts to find any artillery suited to also be employed on the defences. With regard to the French muskets it was obvious that the Moorish irregular cavalry outside were too far away to open fire on. Despite this Bonneville ordered the troops on the walls to open fire, and they did so by volley, pitting the ground about just 35 yards away! This poor showing caused some of the Moors to ride up and jeer at the French, but none came so close as to encourage the soldiers to attempt to shoot at them as individuals. These warriors did however turn their mounts about and ride back to the other fellows when the gate of Fez opened to let
out a sallie force commanded by Colonel de la Bouton!
The three battalions of the 18th Regiment of Foot came out first and formed into a thin two-rank deep line. Six field batteries deployed as well, with one on either end and two between the gap separately each battalion in this manner: ●▬●●▬●●▬●. Ten horse squadrons then formed on each wingof the line (a total of 20 squadrons), and when this first line advanced a second arrayed behind it made up of 16 squadrons of dragoons.
On seeing the sallie force begin to move forward the Moorish horsemen fell back and gathered to either side of their own army which came into view as if ready to give battleat a distance of 2,000 yards from the city walls, to the west. Commander Fatoumah, besides the 30 squadrons of irregular lightcavalry which had joined him on his flanks,had under orders 50 infantry battalions which formed in three distinct lines. The first was made up of ten battalions deployed in skirmish order to his front, the second of 25 battalions of tribal and regular infantry with 22 cannon unlimbered (of various calibres, ranging from light pieces to siege cannon). The final line, with which Fatoumah
stood in person, was of 16 Bukhari infantry battalions. All the Moorish foot have firearms. His heavy cavalry was made up of 14 lancer squadrons which split between the two wings and arrayed close to the infantry and artillery of the main (second) line. Advancing at a walk the French came on, and while doing so the gap between their
first and second lines widened a bit. However they had not move far away from Fez when, while still 1,600 yards away from the Moors (who themselves were now halted), Bonneville had his own field guns unlimber and they began a cannonade. At first this amused the Moors, especially their gunners, who were confident the French could not hit
a thing at such a range, but to their horror roundshot began to strike their ranks and cause casualties! Although the number slain was relatively few, this surprised them and looking to their commander the Moors were ordered to withdraw further westward, which they did while having to suffer the attentionsof the French artillery for the first few hundred yards. Once the Moors had retired further to thewest, the French guns fell silent. Fatoumah had his troops take up a position several miles to the west of Fez on a low ridge line within the valley in the eastern part of the valley called Seba Ayoun and facing Fez. With the blockade of Fez now broken by this action, and with dusk approaching,
Bonneville ordered his troops to return into the city.


Bearing in mind that my opponent was an npc, it gives some idea of the detail that Richard can bring to bear, as well as the flexibility in orders that is available. Anyway, I achieved my objective of driving-off the blockade and then only had to march my weary troops across hundreds of miles of desert to reach the nearest French haven. Why my predecessor was even in the area I'm not sure, some sort of dispute over gold-mining rights (and probably an attempt to show off French arms and uphold his honour - which backfired miserably and may have been the reason he dropped). Mmmm, wonder if that player is still with us here somewhere?

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Thelittleemperor on Sat Mar 18, 2017 6:51 pm

Thanks Louis for all that information and time , interesting stuff , good seeing it from orders to reality ( ahem , well in game reality )
Can anyone tell me if the galleys and galleasses of the battle of Lepanto were practically the same design in our period or were there noticeable differences.Spent a few hours this month looking it up but probably should have started here first.

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Stuart Bailey on Sat Mar 18, 2017 9:17 pm

Thelittleemperor wrote:Thanks Louis for all that information and time , interesting stuff , good seeing it from orders to reality ( ahem , well in game reality )
Can anyone tell me if the galleys and galleasses of the battle of Lepanto were practically the same design in our period or were there noticeable differences.Spent a few hours this month looking it up but probably should have started here first.

Most Galleys & Galleasses in use at the start of the Glori Period and broadly the same as those in use at Lepanto.

Compared to the Galley's in use at Lepanto the French Galley's of the 1690's were larger and had more Guns (up to six large one cannon pointing forward plus small guns). One of the Agema Booklets includes a write up for a large Galley which is closer to the very last Galleys built by the French & Spanish.

Normal Galleys in Glori make quite handy & cheap Privateers & Tugs. Large Galleys are expensive in terms of recruits & cost and are a waste of space in a Naval Battle but half the crew made up of Marines plus easily unloaded Cannon they can make handy and mobile reinforcements and raiders (on land).

Later period Galleasses include both the old lumbering types used at Lepanto (and written up in the rule book).....handy in a dead calm but otherwise rather obsolete and some much more modern Ships like Captain Kidds Adventure Galley (which was a Galleasses not a Galley).

The Adventure Galley built at Deptford in 1695 had 34 Guns and tonnage of 287 tons so in Agema terms is best classed as a Frigate equiped with large oars (Sweeps). Handy for getting into and out of harbour against the wind and if you are becalmed or demasted. pirat

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Thelittleemperor on Sat Mar 18, 2017 9:29 pm

Thanks for that ,I guess the" Adventure Galley "would have a deeper draft than a regular galley ? And the Baltic galleys , I have in mind they must be built differently ,sturdier perhaps ...though I have no proof of that assertion .

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Stuart Bailey on Sat Mar 18, 2017 10:13 pm

Thelittleemperor wrote:Thanks for that ,I guess the" Adventure Galley "would have a deeper draft than a regular galley ? And the Baltic galleys , I have in mind they must be built differently ,sturdier perhaps ...though I have no proof of that assertion .

The Adventure Galley being a three masted sailing ship with a proper keel would have a much deeper draft than a regular galley.....many of which were designed so they could still be beached.

Suspect Baltic Galley's were in general more sturdy than Med ones since Baltic Shipbuilders had greater access to high quality timber and Russian ships of all types were famously sturdy. Probably had to be if they were going to spend 4 months of the year stuck in ice and the rest of the time crewed by Russians.

J Flower
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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by J Flower on Sun Mar 19, 2017 7:54 am

The Naval activity in the Great Northern War included a lot of amphibious operations, with Galleys featuring strongly, the Swedes even developed artillery that could be mounted on galleys & also be dismounted & used on land in support of the Marine contingent/ Galley crews on land. Don't think there is an Agema equivalent for this yet, but would basically be a battalion gun for Marine contingents, maybe a possible breakthrough for Baltic Artillery academies.

Sweden also had two separate Navies one for inshore( Galleys) & the other for the High seas.

Russia also as an emergency measure built ships out of soft woods, not sure how this would be brought over in game maybe less costly or quicker build time, but with a chance that they cannot take as much punishment in battle.
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The Real Louis
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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by The Real Louis on Sat Apr 01, 2017 11:35 am

Well, I'm not a newbie (quite) but I still have a silly question. I can't find the rules on militarising artillery. Can anyone help? (What this game really needs is a comprehensive rules-index!). Hoping to be grateful...
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Jason
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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by Jason on Sat Apr 01, 2017 7:21 pm

I'm sure it doesn't cost any more to raise a battery as 'militarised', you just say it is when you do so. It's the maintenance cost that is different (8K instead of 4K)
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revvaughan
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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

Post by revvaughan on Sat Apr 01, 2017 11:48 pm

I concur with Jason... I don't believe it costs any extra in the beginning, but it is the maintenance fee that hits in the end. If you can afford it I would certainly recommend it.

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Re: A bunch of silly newbie questions

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